Friday, September 5, 2014

Recognize The Evil

On Saturday 30 Aug, three young men in Beirut protested by torching the extremist Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) flag, a black banner emblazoned with the Muslim tenet "there is no god but God and Muhammed is his prophet (Arabic: لَا إِلٰهَ إِلَّا الله مُحَمَّدٌ رَسُولُ الله)." The Lebanese teens then posted a video of the flag-burning online, exhorting others to do the same to demonstrate their opposition to the evil led by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The flag-burning campaign, modeled on the viral "Ice Bucket Challenge," quickly took off on social media under the hashtag #BurnISISFlagChallenge.

Surprisingly, Lebanon’s justice minister, Ashraf Rifi, called for the “sternest punishments” to be applied to the young men because the flag had the Muslim Shahada (declaration of faith), written on it, “which has nothing to do with ISIS and its terrorist approach.” In response, Ibrahim Kanaan, a member of the Change and Reform parliamentary bloc, came forward to declare that he will represent the three boys accused of burning the flags if a case against them ever makes it to court.

It is difficult not to take sides over this incident, given the recent beheadings of two journalists, James Foley, 40, and Steven J. Sotloff, 31, and now a similar threat on David Haines, 44. It is also incredible that there are those who profit from the marketing of the ISIS flag and claim they are have nothing to do with the terrorists. Muhammad Saiful Alam Shah Sudiman, associate research fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, likens it to football fans buying team jerseys to show their support and solidarity. "While the IS certainly did not invent the black flag, they have appropriated it as their brand," explained Dr Haddad of the Middle East Institute at NUS. Just as our national flag has been hijacked by a certain political party, and reason enough for many not to hang it out on national day.

It's more serious in Germany, where the display of the swastika is verboten, tantamount to the display of the Confederate flag in the United States. Both symbols represent dark periods in each country's history. In Germany, even consumer products such as t-shirts and bumper stickers can be confiscated if they contain any depiction of a swastika. The penalty for ignoring the ban is either a fine or imprisonment up to three years. No thanks to Hitler, the symbol used by ancient Celts, Indians, Greeks, and in Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism,  is stigmatized as being associated with Nazism and related concepts of antisemitism, hatred, violence, death, and murder.

The Malaysian Police have done their part to make sure the ISIS wannabes are nipped in the bud. Our Home Team, however, seems to be less pro-active, burying their heads in the sand like ostriches after collecting the 5 to 12 percent salary increases. Unless you are legally blind, there's no mistaking the evil from these sample Google images:



30 comments:

  1. Who funded Al Aqeda in the past? So who is funding IS? Who benefits from chaos? CIA, Unca Sam, arms sellers, oil men?

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    1. Saudi Arabia and other gulf states funded Al Qaeda. IS is funded by rich individuals from the gulf states and from selling oil and other businesses. Countries that sell arms (US, Russia, China, etc) benefited from the chaos.

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    2. really? rich ind? really saudis? I have a bridge I like to sell you! and keep reading the mass propaganda, the vietnam war was started by vietnam too right?

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  2. Why don't their God talk to them and tell them not to do it or commit violence?

    In Sin, God tells or reminds our preachers not to neglect drinking sufficient water each day or where misplaced handphone is etc etc

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  3. I thought only women wear the hajib. How come got so many ah guas doing it to?

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  4. They all cowards. The covering is to add courage to them as the conceal faces signify no one particular person. That's why Spiderman and many Superhero wear masks.

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  5. The voices from mullahs, khomeinis, scholars and islamic academics who condemn these acts are is not audible.

    Not one muslim leader has stood up and say that ISIS is not representative of Islam. If they had, then it must have been said behind closed doors, or behind a scarf that muffles the voice.

    I suppose its in the blood to fight.. since 3BC they have been fighting.. but they dont know how to capitalise on their trait.. should have started a soap opera series... running more than 100 years.

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  6. Where in Islam does the root lay for such violence and destruction.

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    1. God told them to crossover.

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    2. It's in the Quran.

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    3. All religions have an ugly view; it tells us that we are created deiseased by a certain doctor - "All people are initially condemned to hell," it says - that only this doctor has the cure, and we must completely submit to this doctor, in continual worship, praise and obedience, in order to get the cure. The fact that people simply ignore these kinds of utterances, and pass them by with a shrug is perverse; it allows unpleasant nonsense to persist unchallenged, and eventually a few hot headed devotees of this view will do a lot of harm in service to it.

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    4. No, it's not in the Quran. Like the Crusades - is it in the Bible?

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    5. It IS in the Quran - http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/Quran/023-violence.htm

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    6. What can be more violent than the Old Testament?

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    7. Does it matter? Both are books of imaginary shit used by the deluded and the power-hungry for their own nefarious purposes.

      The Quran IS full of violence, deal with it.

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    8. Please guys, both the Quran and the Bibble are not written by the gods but the people. The preachers of the religions are men, not god, and the interpretation of those text are also by men, not god.

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    9. Yup, because there is no god.

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  7. Can God talk to a Muslim? Or are Muslims like Christians able to hear God?

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  8. We are moving into a barbaric age with beheading. Hopefully the west will move in the same direction instead of respecting any Geneva convention by sending any captured ISIS to be eaten live by animals.

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  9. Wah!
    I always thot that only white colour was evil.

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    1. ha!ha!.. good one!

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  10. /// Anonymous9/05/2014 3:36 PM
    It's in the Quran. ///

    /// It IS in the Quran - http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/Quran/023-violence.htm ///

    I am not a Muslim, but the violence in the Quran is largely a defence against attacks, and far less bloody and violent than the Bible.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124494788

    http://www.godlessgeeks.com/LINKS/BibleViolence.htm

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    1. So it IS violent, right?

      Who the fuck gives a damn about which book about an imaginary god is more or less violent about another book about another imaginary god? I don't.

      You want to defend the Quran, go ahead. Just be aware that its followers won't care about your anonymous white knight efforts in some corner of the internet.

      Run into the wrong muslim and you'll still be considered a dirty kuffar who should be slaughtered like the rest of the non-believers.

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    2. Stupid argument: "this thing is not bad, because another thing is worse".

      Dumb like fuck.

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    3. Why pick on one and not the other? Both are violent.
      Fuck like dumb.

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  11. | Why pick on one and not the other?

    Wow you really are a fucktard.

    1) Please read the whole blog post and all the comments here, and POINT OUT where exactly people are defending Christianity for their violence but criticizing Islam for theirs. I'll wait.

    2) The FACT is there is NO place in the world right now where mass numbers of militant Christians are gathering in the name of their imaginary god to claim land and torture / behead / kill non-Christians. If there was, you can be sure that people will "pick on" Christianity too, don't worry.

    3) If talking about Islamic violence instead of Christian violence constitutes "picking on" in your obviously stunted mind, do you also go to websites talking about the Ebola virus and say similar things like, "Why pick on Ebola and not AIDS? Both make their victims suffer and die horribly."

    Dumb ass.

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  12. "Both make their victims suffer and die horribly".

    And they killed for reason hard to understand and justify.

    The Lures of Virgins and Heaven must have made them crazy and lose their humanities.

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  13. Man are killing people in the name of God, period. If there is no God, then there should be no senseless killing, right? But God never tell anyone to kill. If he did, he wouldn't have been God in the first place.

    So God or no God, people will still kill for some reason, nothing to do with God. Just like Singapore will continue to manufacture weapons for sale. So who to blame?

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    1. You are wrong on a fundamental level. If you had even a sliver of real knowledge regarding the Abrahamic religions, you wouldn't have wrote what you did.

      It has everything to do with god - there are links provided by 2 people above to verses in the Koran and Bible that promote violence and killing; please go and read them. Fact: the Islamic and Christian gods have told followers to kill others (primarily non-believers).

      "If there is no God, then there should be no senseless killing, right?" Doesn't follow. People have killed because of voices in their head that they attribute to spirits, demons, historical / imaginary figures, etc. The actual existence of those things have no impact on whether people kill in their name.

      "So who to blame?" We should blame god, even if it doesn't exist. Because belief in it causes people to act on yet another difference between them that doesn't actually mean anything (i.e. the difference in religion), and leads them to do irrational things like killing people or joining militant causes in its name.

      Yes, people will still do bad things even if god doesn't exist. But that's no reason not to blame it or try to remove the irrational belief in it.

      In short, your whole premise is one big faulty argument that kind of goes like this: "without dengue fever people will still die from other diseases, so why bother fighting dengue?"

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  14. The problem is the religion itself. There are elements within the religion's teachings that can---and will--- be used to justify killing others of different beliefs. After all, monotheistic religions must be --- by their very nature--- intolerant

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